News of work in progress, exhibitions and events.

November 2020

Google Earth Satellite Map, showing 2 circular walking routes.

20 walks in oil paint on canvas  100cms x 80cms.

 

20 Walks July – August 2020  

This new set of work for the Map Project is based on our walks, which we always record on Google Earth. By selecting one of the  recorded walks, you can see it on the satellite image. Above, on the photo of the Google screen, two walks are shown.

 How interesting the shapes are! I can see the bits where we got lost and had to double back. Can you see them on the oil painting?  They are both included on the canvas, but the lower one is reversed, top to bottom. (It’s red shaded) The other one is yellow, top right.

 The canvas includes 20 walks. As a work in progress, it needs more additional information. I’ll be returning to it later.  We have roughly 50 recorded walks altogether on Google Earth.

 

 

 

 

 

The short video records experimentation with the shapes of the walks. 

I made bent wire copies of the walk shapes and took rubbings from them. With a strong light from the front, the wires cast shadows onto the rubbings.

There are 20 examples of this – to be shown in exhibition in Settle, together with the painting. They will be exhibited as drawings and wire shapes. I hope to hang the wire shapes in front of the drawings to cast shadows onto the paper.

Our walks are not published routes and may never be followed by anyone again. They are transitory. As the years pass, they are like shadows in our memories.

 

 

 

October 2020

This stone carving is connected to the map project, which is destined, we hope, for the Craven Arts exhibition in Settle, now planned for summer 2021.

In the form of a way-marker which might be set into a stone wall, it directs the walker of footpaths towards “desire lines.”

I like the idea of desire lines. They sound mysterious and sexy. They seem unpredictable, like the progression of a relationship with twists and turns built in.

In fact, they are unofficial paths which cut through nature in unregulated ways. They are the result of people heading off into the territory of nature, wilfully and to the detriment of the nature they want to see. They are the opposite of official footpaths, as printed on OS maps.

The consequences of unregulated activity might be bad for the environment and spoil the enjoyment of others.

On the other hand, is it always a good thing to personally obey the rules?

On occasion, desire lines in cities delineate the shortest route from A to B. The planned city route for walkers might have more to do with landscape design and vehicle movement, than the convenience of people on foot. What tired walkers in a hurry need is the shortest route.

Should the rules be obeyed, by everybody, without exception?

Are all desires valid?

September 2020

A lot of people working with Craven Arts, have been preparing for an exhibition which was to be in June 2020. It has been rescheduled for 2021, so fortunately I should still be able to show some map based work. Others are collaborating with me on the theme of Maps.

 

 

The Exhibition will be at The Folly in Settle and the organisers are keen that our work has a local connection. Focussing on the Ordnance Survey map of the area, I have picked out some of the symbols used to identify tourist attractions and made card cut-outs of them.

 

 

 

The card shapes are placed under the paper and rubbed over with a graphite stick. By using the card shapes in a dislocated way I seek to disrupt the facts, in the same way that many rules, moral assumptions and laws are being disrupted in our time. Mapping

The Ordnance Survey was a supreme example of measured accuracy. As with other maps, it was undertaken to make the deployment of troops easier and to show clear ownership of land.

 

Back